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  • Acetaminophen...

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  • Celebrex (Celecoxib)

    What is Celebrex? Celebrex is in a group of drugs called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). It works by reducing hormones that cause inflammation and pain. Celebrex is used to treat pain or inflammation caused by many conditions such as arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and menstrual pain. It is also used in the treatment of hereditary polyps in the colon Celebrex may also be used for other purposes not listed. Celebrex side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop taking Celebrex and seek medical attention or call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects: chest pain, weakness, shortness of breath, slurred speech, problems with vision or balance; black, bloody, or tarry stools; coughing up blood or vomit that looks like coffee grounds; swelling or rapid weight gain; urinating less than usual or not at all; nausea, stomach pain, low fever, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); fever, sore throat, and headache with a severe blistering, peeling, and red skin rash; or bruising, severe tingling, numbness, pain, muscle weakness. Less serious Celebrex side effects may include: upset stomach, mild heartburn, diarrhea, constipation; bloating, gas; dizziness, nervousness, headache; skin rash, itching; blurred vision; or ringing in your ears. This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. CELEBREX (CELECOXIB)Celebrex (Celecoxib) is used to reduce pain, inflammation, and stiffness caused by osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis. Celecoxib is also used to reduce the number of adenomatous colorectal polyps in familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), to treat acute pain, and to treat pain associated with menstruation.

  • Soma (Carisoprodol)

    HOW TO USE

    Take this medication by mouth with or without food as directed by your doctor, usually 4 times a day.
    The dosage is based on your medical condition and response to treatment. This medication should only be used short-term (for 3 weeks or less) unless directed by your doctor. Do not increase your dose or use this drug more often or for longer than prescribed. Your condition will not improve any faster, and your risk of side effects will increase.
    This medication may cause withdrawal reactions, especially if it has been used regularly for a long time or in high doses. In such cases, withdrawal symptoms (such as stomach cramps, trouble sleeping, headache, nausea) may occur if you suddenly stop using this medication. To prevent withdrawal reactions, your doctor may reduce your dose gradually. Consult your doctor or pharmacist for more details, and report any withdrawal reactions immediately.

    SIDES EFFECTS

    Dizziness, drowsiness, or headache may occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.
    Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.
    Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects, including: confusion.
    A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.
    This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.


    DRUG INTERACTIONS

    Drug interactions may change how your medications work or increase your risk for serious side effects. This document does not contain all possible drug interactions. Keep a list of all the products you use (including prescription/nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicines without your doctor's approval.
    Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking other products that cause drowsiness including alcohol, antihistamines (such as cetirizine, diphenhydramine), drugs for sleep or anxiety (such as alprazolam, diazepam, meprobamate, zolpidem), other muscle relaxants, and narcotic pain relievers (such as codeine).

  • Tramadol (Ultram)

    HOW TO USE

    Take this medication by mouth as directed by your doctor, usually every 4 to 6 hours as needed for pain relief. You may take this drug with or without food. If you have nausea, it may help to take this drug with food. Ask your doctor or pharmacist about other ways to decrease nausea (such as lying down for 1 to 2 hours with as little head movement as possible).
    The dosage is based on your medical condition and response to treatment. To reduce your risk of side effects, your doctor may direct you to start this medication at a low dose and gradually increase your dose. Follow your doctor's instructions carefully. The maximum recommended dose is 400 milligrams per day. If you are older than 75 years, the maximum recommended dose is 300 milligrams per day. Do not increase your dose, take the medication more frequently, or take it for a longer time than prescribed. Properly stop the medication when so directed.
    Pain medications work best if they are used as the first signs of pain occur. If you wait until the pain has worsened, the medication may not work as well.
    If you have ongoing pain (such as due to arthritis), your doctor may direct you to also take long-acting narcotic medications. Other non-narcotic pain relievers (such as acetaminophen, ibuprofen) may also be prescribed with this medication. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions about using tramadol safely with other drugs.

    SIDES EFFECTS

    Nausea, vomiting, constipation, lightheadedness, dizziness, drowsiness, or headache may occur. Some of these side effects may decrease after you have been using this medication for a while. If any of these effects persist or worsen, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.
    To prevent constipation, eat a diet adequate in fiber, drink plenty of water, and exercise. Ask your pharmacist for help in selecting a laxative (such as a stimulant type with stool softener).
    To reduce the risk of dizziness and lightheadedness, get up slowly when rising from a sitting or lying position.
    Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.
    Tell your doctor right away if any of these unlikely but serious side effects occur: mental/mood changes (such as agitation, confusion, hallucinations), severe stomach/abdominal pain, difficulty urinating.
    Get medical help right away if any of these rare but serious side effects occur: fainting, seizure, slow/shallow breathing, unusual drowsiness/difficulty waking up.
    This medication may increase serotonin and rarely cause a very serious condition called serotonin syndrome/toxicity. The risk increases if you are also taking other drugs that increase serotonin, so tell your doctor or pharmacist of all the drugs you take (see Drug Interactions section). Get medical help right away if you develop some of the following symptoms: fast heartbeat, hallucinations, loss of coordination, severe dizziness, severe nausea/vomiting/diarrhea, twitching muscles, unexplained fever, unusual agitation/restlessness.
    A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any of the following symptoms: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

    DRUG INTERACTIONS

    Some products that may interact with this drug include: certain pain medications (mixed narcotic agonist-antagonists such as pentazocine, nalbuphine, butorphanol), narcotic antagonists (such as naltrexone).
    Taking MAO inhibitors with this medication may cause a serious (possibly fatal) drug interaction. Avoid taking MAO inhibitors (isocarboxazid, linezolid, methylene blue, moclobemide, phenelzine, procarbazine, rasagiline, selegiline, tranylcypromine) during treatment with this medication. Most MAO inhibitors should also not be taken for two weeks before treatment with this medication. Ask your doctor when to start or stop taking this medication.
    The risk of serotonin syndrome/toxicity increases if you are also taking other drugs that increase serotonin. Examples include street drugs such as MDMA/"ecstasy," St. John's wort, certain antidepressants (including SSRIs such as fluoxetine/paroxetine, SNRIs such as duloxetine/venlafaxine), among others. The risk of serotonin syndrome/toxicity may be more likely when you start or increase the dose of these drugs.
    Other medications can affect the removal of tramadol from your body, which may affect how tramadol works. Examples include quinidine, azole antifungals (such as itraconazole), HIV drugs (such as ritonavir), macrolide antibiotics (such as erythromycin), rifamycins (such as rifampin), drugs used to treat seizures (such as carbamazepine), among others.
    The risk of serious side effects (such as slow/shallow breathing, severe drowsiness) may be increased if this medication is taken with other products that may also affect breathing or cause drowsiness. Therefore, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking other products such as alcohol, allergy or cough-and-cold products, medicine for sleep or anxiety (such as alprazolam, diazepam, zolpidem), muscle relaxants, other narcotic pain relievers (such as morphine), and psychiatric medicines (such as risperidone, amitriptyline, trazodone). Your medications or doses of your medications may need to be changed.

  • Codeine

    HOW TO USE
     
    Take this medication by mouth as directed by your doctor. Pain medications work best when taken at the first signs of pain. If you wait until the pain has worsened, the medication may not work as well. The dosage is based on your medical condition and response to therapy. For children, the dosage is also based on weight. If so directed by your doctor, you may also use long-acting narcotic medications for ongoing pain. In that case, this medication might be used when needed for sudden attacks of "breakthrough" pain. Also follow your doctor's or pharmacist's instructions for the safe use of non-narcotic pain relievers (e.g., acetaminophen, ibuprofen). Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions about your treatment.

    SIDE EFFECTS 

    Nausea commonly occurs with the use of codeine and usually goes away after the first few doses. Consult your doctor or pharmacist about ways to decrease nausea (e.g., antihistamines, taking with food, lying down for 1-2 hours with as little head movement as possible).
    Lightheadedness, dizziness, drowsiness, dry mouth, flushing, vomiting, constipation, and sweating may also occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, notify your doctor or pharmacist promptly.
    To prevent constipation, maintain a diet adequate in fiber, drink plenty of water, and exercise. If you become constipated while using this drug, consult your pharmacist for help in selecting a laxative (such as stimulant-type with stool softener).
    Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.
    Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects, including: mental/mood changes (such as agitation, restlessness), fast/slow/irregular heartbeat, vision changes, severe stomach/abdominal pain, change in the amount of urine.
    Get medical help right away if you have any very serious side effects, including: fainting, seizures.

    DRUG INTERACTIONS

    Drug interactions may change how your medications work or increase your risk for serious side effects. This document does not contain all possible drug interactions. Keep a list of all the products you use (including prescription/nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicines without your doctor's approval.
    Some products that may interact with this drug include: certain pain medications (mixed narcotic agonist-antagonists such as butorphanol/nalbuphine), narcotic antagonists (such as naltrexone).
    The risk of serious side effects (such as slow/shallow breathing, severe drowsiness/dizziness) may be increased if this medication is taken with other products that may also affect breathing or cause drowsiness. Therefore, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking other products such as alcohol, medicine for sleep or anxiety (such as alprazolam, diazepam, zolpidem), muscle relaxants, and other narcotic pain relievers (such as morphine).

  • Hydrocodone

    Product images are for illustrative purposes only

    HOW TO USE
     
    Take this medication by mouth as directed by your doctor. It is usually given as a single dose before a procedure or anesthesia.

    Take this medication by mouth as directed by your doctor. You may take this drug with or without food. If you have nausea, it may help to take this drug with food. Ask your doctor or pharmacist about other ways to decrease nausea (such as lying down for 1 to 2 hours with as little head movement as possible).

    Pain medications work best if they are used as the first signs of pain occur. If you wait until the pain has worsened, the medication may not work as well.

    SIDE EFFECTS 

    Nausea, vomiting, constipation, lightheadedness, dizziness, or drowsiness may occur. Some of these side effects may decrease after you have been using this medication for a while. If any of these effects persist or worsen, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.
    To prevent constipation, eat a diet adequate in fiber, drink plenty of water, and exercise. Consult your pharmacist for help in selecting a laxative (such as a stimulant type with stool softener).
    To reduce the risk of dizziness and lightheadedness, get up slowly when rising from a sitting or lying position.

    Tell your doctor immediately if any of these unlikely but serious side effects occur: mental/mood changes, severe stomach/abdominal pain, difficulty urinating.
    Seek immediate medical attention if any of these rare but serious side effects occur: fainting, seizure, slow/shallow breathing, unusual drowsiness/difficulty waking up.
    A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, seek immediate medical attention if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

    DRUG INTERACTIONS

    One ingredient in this product is acetaminophen. Taking too much acetaminophen may cause serious (possibly fatal) liver disease. Adults should not take more than 4000 milligrams (4 grams) of acetaminophen a day. If you have liver problems, consult your doctor or pharmacist for a safe dosage of this medication. Daily use of alcohol, especially when combined with acetaminophen, may increase your risk for liver damage. Avoid alcohol. Check with your doctor or pharmacist for more information. Get medical help right away if you have any symptoms of liver damage, including: dark urine, persistent nausea/vomiting, stomach/abdominal pain, extreme tiredness, or yellowing eyes/skin.
    Acetaminophen is an ingredient found in many nonprescription products and in some combination prescription medications (such as pain/fever drugs or cough-and-cold products). Carefully check the labels on all your medicines because they may also contain acetaminophen. Ask your pharmacist about using those products safely. Get medical help right away if you have taken more than 4000 milligrams of acetaminophen a day, even if you feel well.

    Some products that may interact with this drug include: certain pain medications (mixed narcotic agonist/antagonists such as pentazocine, nalbuphine, butorphanol), ketoconazole, narcotic antagonists (such as naltrexone), MAO inhibitors (isocarboxazid, linezolid, methylene blue, moclobemide, phenelzine, procarbazine, rasagiline, selegiline, tranylcypromine).
    The risk of serious side effects (such as slow/shallow breathing, severe drowsiness, dizziness) may be increased if this medication is taken with other products that may also affect breathing or cause drowsiness. Therefore, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking other products such as alcohol, allergy or cough-and-cold products, anti-seizure drugs (such as phenobarbital), medicine for sleep or anxiety (such as alprazolam, diazepam, zolpidem), muscle relaxants, other narcotic pain relievers (such as morphine), and psychiatric medicines (such as risperidone, amitriptyline, trazodone). Your medications or doses of your medications may need to be changed.

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